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  • The challenges of working onboard

    Being far away from family, missing important moments in the life of persons that you love, making new friendships… These are all challenges shared in the onboard working!

    Recently, the demand for professionals who want to work offshore has increased, and not for less. With attractive advantages, more and more people have become interested in this sector.

    Five years ago, when Rodrigo Teixeira was still not sure about which career he would like to choose, he heard about a job thathad a good salary, travel around the world, and had vacations during the year,so he decided to venture into the onboarding work.

    We contacted Rodrigo, because, besides being a professional in the maritime area, he also shares his knowledge and experiences about working onboard. With more than 50,000 followers on YouTube, he uses his creativity to disseminate information about the daily life on the platforms. In his channel “Eu, Digo, Rodrigo”, the videos already have 711,000 views.

    WHAT THE ONBOARDING WORK IS LIKE

    Although offering many advantages, working onboard requires preparation, not only physically, but also mentally. Most companies – if not all – require rigorous examinations, training, and qualifications. to be prepared for work on the platforms and ships. A work shift on a platform lasts 12 hours (interspersed with 12 hours of rest). For this and other reasons, the shifts demand more than the working hours of other more common land-based workers, justifying the value of the starting salary.

    When compared to the average salary in Brazil, especially in the CLT regime, the salaries of a shipped worker become extremely attractive. Nevertheless, the competition is very competitive and requires preparation to fill these positions. Rodrigo tells us that one of the main tips for those who want to pursue this area may seem obvious, but it is very important: studying the contents of the competition to become a merchant marine officeris essential. Learning English is also important and according to Rodrigo, even apps, internet courses and YouTube channels can bring vast knowledge.

    A LOT OF STORIES TO TELL

    Wandering around the internet you can find the most different reports. Crew members fishing on the high seas, constructions such as houses floating in the way, dangerous storms, and among many other situations shared by most of the people who dedicate themselves to this profession.

    Although he has never witnessed houses, Rodrigo shared with us that he has seen boxes and couches on the high seas and that although he doesn’t have that many memorable moments, some memories stand out.

    “Thinking back here I didn’t have such a defining moment. I could answer that it was the first time I went on a ship. It was interesting because, especially when it is unloaded, you look up and realize that it is a very giant construction. Or maybe it was my first sailing service as an officer. To think about it, I was 23 years old, transporting a cargo worth a few million reais, on a ship worth millions of reais, at dawn, all alone on the gangway. I kind of felt the weight of the responsibility,” he tells us.

    He also highlights that during the 5 years in the profession, the stories shared by friends and co-workers are also remarkable. “I had colleagues who lost the birth of their children because they were on board, colleagues who went through very strong storms, to the point of breaking several of the ship’s machines. In short, if you take a crew of mostly experienced people, the stories are endless.

    Nevertheless, life in platform jobs is very dynamic and requires a lot of preparation from those interested in adapting well and dealing with new situations that are not common to all professions on the market.

     

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